Monday, October 20, 2014

Mark Warner, no friend of the First Amendment

Mark Warner was elected to the U.S. Senate from Virginia in 2008. In the time since then, the senior senator from Virginia has voted against medical privacy, against rights of free assembly through insurance for health care, against rights of conscience and religious liberty, and against free speech for the American people.

Friday, July 25, 2014

70 Questions for State Legislators to Ask About Driverless Vehicles

Transportation brings some of the newest forms of technology to some of the oldest functions in society. Moving people and moving property from one place to another are among the most basic elements of an economy.

The mass production of the Ford Model T was a truly revolutionary development to land-based transportation in the early 20th century. The “horseless carriage” has obviously been a worldwide success.

For a variety of reasons social and otherwise, the allure of driving no longer always maintains its shine. Whether for short trips around town or long trips across the country, there are times when a land-based form of autopilot would be preferred.

While many have dreamed of driving automation for decades, a few companies are now pouring serious resources into autonomous car development and gaining remarkable traction.

That these cars are not only in development, but on public roads in live test mode should be a sign to both citizen and legislator alike that it is now time to seriously and thoroughly ask questions about how driverless vehicles should be deployed among us.

Much of the media coverage to date on self-driving technology has not yet narrowed its focus to public safety and the in-depth implications of these vehicles operating in our many forms of public traffic. One high-profile article was even titled, “How Google Got States to Legalize Driverless Cars.”

The following questions are offered in the interest of stirring public discussion and debate on these technology developments.

Wednesday, September 4, 2013

What I learned

A year ago today was a special election in Virginia for the 45th District House seat. I was one of the candidates in that election.

Often the first question people ask about that experience is, "What did you learn from that?" It's an especially appropriate question during this, another back-to-school week. My answer has become consistent.

I learned how to weep for my city.